Hereditory Pathology
 
Rules/Help

Welcome to the Help and FAQ section.

Solutions to common questions and problems are listed here. The User Guide for the website can be downloaded below (just click on the linked text or on the picture itself).
If you inadvertently come across something you don't understand or isn't clear, please don't hesitate to let us know by sending a mail to us.


Manual to the site, v. 2.0.
Click to download PDF
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Collaborate with Hereditary Pathology?


We welcome new collaborators!
If you are interested in collaborating with the Hereditary Pathology project, drop us a mail at hereditarypathology@lumc.nl or J.Morreau@lumc.nl.

Likewise, if you already have an interesting case series you want to publish on our site, contact us at hereditarypathology@lumc.nl or J.Morreau@lumc.nl.

Frequently asked questions (FAQ)

1. I forgot or lost my password, what do I do now?
If you forgot your password, click Moderator on the top navigation bar, then click Lost password and/or login name? in the Moderator Login box (see figure below).

Enter your email address and username in the box shown below and click Reset password. A new password will be sent to the email address you provide. This password can be changed in the Personal information section after logging into the user area.

2. I forgot or lost my username, what do I do now?
If you have forgotten your username, click Moderator on the top navigation bar. In the Moderator Login box, click Lost password and/or login name?. Then enter your e-mail address you used during registration, click Retrieve your username and your username will be sent to this email address.

3. I forgot the e-mail address I use on the site, what to do now?
Go to the Contact Us page and send us an email with your username. If you’ve also forgotten your username, send us your Affiliation that you registered with on the site, or any information that you still do know about your account and the administrators will try to find your account in the database. Or, if you have added a case on the site before, go to your case and look next to Author to see your username.

4. I am a contributor to the site, why can I not delete a case category/the case category that I made myself?
Deleting a case category is deemed too sensitive to allow newly registered users to do, as this uncouples all cases from their category. This allows for vandalism. If you want us to delete a case category, send an e-mail to hereditarypathology@lumc.nl or j.morreau@lumc.nl and we will delete the category for you.

5. Why does the site look different on Google Chrome, Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox?
These small disparities are the result of the software behind each browser rendering the site commands differently. We mostly feel these differences do not greatly affect the site's browsing experience, so we let them be.

6. Whenever I try to add content in Internet Explorer, I get a pop-up talking about "Activate ActiveX elements and plug-ins"
We have had the same problem. Go to Tools>Internet Options>Security>Custom level>Enable Active X. If you cannot change this setting, it is most likely because only the System Administrator can change the settings. Contact the System Administrator to fix the problem.

7. Why am I logged out when adding content in an organ, case category or case?
This is due to your content editing time exceeding the server’s “idle time”, i.e. the time where there is no page refresh. We cannot change this time as it is server wide. We strongly advise you to copy the text into a text processor before uploading, or to open a separate tab or window and seeing if you are still logged in, and logging in if this is not the case, as it is highly frustrating to spend a period of time editing something only to have it lost.




Innumerable colonic polyps in Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Show picture.

Some features of Neuro-fibromatosis, type 1. Show picture.

Humans aren't the only species to be
afflicted with hereditary conditions...
Whitie the albino alligator. Show picture.

Facial tricholemmomas in Cowden syndrome. Show picture.